SPACE-MAN

Ask me absolutely anythingSubmitNext pageArchive

Anonymous asked: What do you think is the funniest thing you've ever written in a comic?

brianmichaelbendis:

its a tie!!!

image

but for the best thing ever done by anyone in the world go to the back issue bins and find…

where you get genius like this… :)

jedavu:

THE WORLD I SEE

by L. QUILES

(via caribeanboii)

iwantyoureffingtatertots:

I want someone who will sit on a rooftop with me at 2 in the morning and will tell me their favorite songs and their family problems and how they think the earth was made

(via lovee-is-forr-childrenn)

marvelentertainment:

Great art by Stephanie Hans - read the solo adventures of the Young Avengers with Marvel Unlimited, here!

L E G E N D A R Y
tarkovskymalick:

Gangs of New York- Daniel Day Lewis


It’s not who I am underneath, it’s what I do that defines me.

brianmichaelbendis:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1986: Marvel Graphic Novel #24 (Daredevil: Love and War)

From the same interview with manwithoutfear.com:

When I began drawing the first issue, I was working twice up, not one and a half times up, size-wise. I wanted to treat the Kingpin as this huge monolith, immoveable object - and regular comic size pages seemed too small. Frank, Ralph Macchio and myself were trying to keep the whole job under wraps, because we were all pretty aware that it was pretty radical although Frank and I agreed that the approach simply felt right. My treatment of the Kingpin became a rather well known secret around the office - everyone who heard about them wanted to see the pages - it seems like everyone knew about them but [former editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. When Jim did find out about the job, he was adamant. No way was this going to see print in the regular comic. It was too radical and it veered too far afield of the established continuity. Jim called me in his office and said that he wanted to give us a chance to do the job - his solution was to turn it into a graphic novel. I was a bit disappointed in this option. I wanted to do it as a regular issue - or two - to me THAT was the arena for change. Graphic novels were outside the world of the actual comics and Frank and I wanted to see how far we could push things in REGULAR comics.

I hope we showed that an immoveable object could be reduced to rubble emotionally, internally by that from which his size affords no protection. Pretty classic resonance in terms of his jealousy and rage - all things readers can identify with in terms of universal emotional buttons. It’s what’s lacking in a lot of books and Hollywood fare. Character-driven action-people that you may not like, but who impact you. Not simply the latest “asteroid” movie with cardboard cutouts as characters. When I think of “cartoon characters,” oddly, I think of characters you can identify with (I still care about the Coyote in the Road Runner cartoons, I couldn’t care less about Bruce Willis in Armageddon).

(Source: comicartistevolution)

theidiotking:

this is a perfect joke.

(Source: rach-maninov, via shimanatalia)